Learn Not To Fall
HOW OFTEN FALLS OCCUR
  • About one third of the elder population over the age of 65 falls each year, and the risk of falls increases proportionately with age. At 80 years, over half of seniors fall annually.
  • As alarming as they are, these documented statistics fall short of the actual number since
    many incidents are unreported by seniors and unrecognized by family members or caregivers.
  • Frequent falling. Those who fall are two to three times more likely to fall again.
  • About half (53%) of the older adults who are discharged for fall-related hip fractures will experience another fall with in six months.

 

What Happens After a Fall

 

  • Falls are the leading cause of death due to injury among the elderly 87% of all fractures in the elderly are due to falls.
  • Falls account for 25% of all hospital admissions, and 40% of all nursing home admissions 40% of those admitted do not return to independent living; 25% die within a year.
  • Many falls do not result in injuries, yet a large percentage of non-injured fallers (47%) cannot get up without assistance.
  • For the elderly who fall and are unable to get up on their own, the period of time spent immobile often affects their health outcome. Muscle cell breakdown starts to occur within 30-60 minutes of compression due to falling. Dehydration, pressure sores, hypothermia, and pneumonia are other complications that may result.
  • Getting help after an immobilizing fall improves the chance of survival by 80% and increases the likelihood of a return to independent living.
  • Up to 40% of people who have a stroke have a serious fall within the next year.
  • Fear of Falling
  • Why Seniors Fall
  • Where Seniors Fall
  • Falls Are A National Health Priority